When Artists Attack the King: Honore Daumier and 'La Caricature,' 1830-1835

When
Event has passed (Wed Aug 1, 2012 - Mon Nov 12, 2012)
Tags
Arts, Museums

Description

As press coverage of the 2012 American presidential election heats up, this exhibition explores the art that ignited a 19th-century battle over politics and freedom of the press. The weekly Paris journal La Caricature, founded in 1830 shortly after Louis-Philippe I (1773-1850) took the French throne, quickly became the King's worst enemy in his fight for popular approval. It published hundreds of lithographs by Honore Daumier (1808-1879) and other artists that thoroughly ridiculed the July Monarchy, as Louis-Philippe's reign was known. See how, in the approximately 50 prints on view, La Caricature used social satire, visual puns, and physical caricature to mock the July Monarchy's ministers, their censorship of the press, and the King's physical appearance.

More Info

Link
http://museum.stanford.edu
Call
650-723-4177

Schedule

Cantor Arts Center
328 Lomita Dr
Stanford, CA
Event has passed

Comments

Location

  1. Cantor Arts Center
    328 Lomita Dr, Stanford, CA