There’s one thing to be said for Anthony Weiner. Though his Twitter account was not hacked as he originally claimed, as far as excuses go, it was pretty good. It may have even been inspirational. CNET is reporting that a group of hackers known as Lulz Security successfully hacked the Senate’s computers and gained access to its server’s directory and file structure.

There’s one thing to be said for Anthony Weiner. Though his Twitter account was not hacked as he originally claimed, as far as excuses go, it was pretty good. It may have even been inspirational. CNET is reporting that a group of hackers known as Lulz Security successfully hacked the Senate’s computers and gained access to its server’s directory and file structure.

Based on the group’s website, the hack may have been a response to a statement by the Pentagon that it would regard cyberattacks as an “act of war.” Lulz wrote: “We don’t like the U.S. government very much,” and continued, “This is a small, just-for-kicks release of some internal data from Senate.gov—is this an act of war, gentlemen?”

The Office of the Senate’s Sergeant at Arms does not seem too concerned by the attacks. A statement they issues said that, “That server is for public access on the public side of the Senate’s network firewall, and any files that individual Senate offices place there are intended for public consumption.” Apparently, by public consumption, they mean hacking into the root directory.

Lulzsec is a relatively new hacker group, but it has already made quite a name for itself. In the past month alone, it has infiltrated the computer systems of the U.S. Public Broadcasting Service, Atlanta Infrared, which works closely with the FBI, and Sony. They recently hacked into Bethesda Softworks too, but say that this was to encourage the company to speed up the release of its latest Skyrim game.

Read More at CNET.
See the results at the Lulz website.
Read More at Computer World.
Read More at the Associated Press.